WA Rural Leaders Call for Greater Promotion of Primary Production

From left: Suzanne Woods, President WA Australian Women in Agriculture; Irene Mills, President of the National Rural Women’s Coalition; Elizabeth Brennan, President of Australian Women in Agriculture.
From left: Suzanne Woods, President WA Australian Women in Agriculture; Irene Mills, President of the National Rural Women’s Coalition; Elizabeth Brennan, President of Australian Women in Agriculture.

Currently six presidents of key national and state rural women’s organisations reside in the Northern Agricultural Region. Taking advantage of this unusual circumstance, NACC and Landcare invited the Presidents of the National Rural Women’s Coalition (NRWC), Australian Women in Agriculture (AWiA), WA Rural, Remote and Regional Network (RRR), WA AWiA, Women’s Industry Network Seafood Community (WINSC) and CWA of WA to dinner for wide-ranging discussions on issues affecting rural women.

Right now, the Northern Agricultural Region of WA has an unusual confluence of Australian rural women leaders; Irene Mills AM OSJ from Dalwallinu is President of the National Rural Women’s Coalition, a Member of the Southern Governing Council, Chair Western Wheatbelt District Health Advisory Council and President of the Dalwallinu CRC.; Elizabeth Brennan from Wongan Hills (almost in the NAR!) is President of Australian Women in Agriculture; Leonie Noble from Geraldton is Chair of the Rural, Remote and Regional (RRR) Network of Western Australia and the WA Director of the Women’s Industry Network Seafood Community; Suzanne Woods from Calingiri is President of WA Australian Women in Agriculture; and Sarah Kenny from Badgingarra is President of CWA of WA.

To celebrate these women, their achievements and their long-term commitment to rural communities in this region, NACC hosted a Presidential dinner for the leaders following an enlightening day at the Liebe Women’s Field Day on 19 June. While not everyone was able to attend, the generosity of time and resources they all dedicate to rural women was toasted. As you can imagine the discussion was wide-ranging but rising to the surface was the recurring themes of the need for greater promotion of primary production in this state, of healthy food, of rural life – a great place to work and live.

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