Managing a Breeding Population of Endangered Carnaby’s Black–Cockatoo (Calyptorhynchus latirostris) on the Edge of their Range

NACC NRM and partners have been studying a Carnaby Black-Cockatoo population at Murchison House Station. This is the northern edge of the species known range, so we had some questions we wanted to answer.

Carnaby’s Black-Cockatoos are an iconic Western Australian bird, and their habitat for breeding and forage has drastically changed across their range causing them to be currently considered endangered.

First of all, we wanted to confirm if it was just sightings or if Carnaby’s were using the Murchison River for breeding. If so, how many hollows were being used? Over two years Murchison Station owners Belinda and Callum Carruth, NACC NRM, Birdlife, Australian Black-cockatoo Specialists, WA Parks and Wildlife service and passionate volunteers set out to monitor this interesting flock of Carnaby’s and record the unique conditions and values of their habitat.

We had an amazing journey working together with our stakeholders and volunteers to check hundreds of natural hollows in the heat, cold and rain over many hours and many hectares within the beautiful woodlands that exist on Murchison House Station.

We are excited to announce these findings! Read our published article here.

This project is supported by NACC NRM through funding from the Australian Governments Environmental Restoration fund.  

Jarna Kendle – Biodiversity Program Coordinator

2 comments

An incredible journey of discovery with amazing people ….. and of course the amazing opportunity to see these beautiful birds thriving in their natural habitat …. Huge thanks to each and every one of you for your dedication, never ending enthusiasm and above all passion for the Carnabys black cockatoo ….. total heart melters …. So much more to learn ……

Hi Heather.
It is always nice to hear about our Carnabys. I am very happy to share that I have had both red and white tail in my trees for around 20 years in the hills.

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