Cockatoo Club Med Gets New Accommodation

Birdlife and NACC NRM’s ‘Protecting WA’s Black-cockatoos’ project is proud to announce the first installment of artificial hollows is completed and awaiting their new residents.

Rick Dawson from Australian Black-cockatoo specialist says Coomallo is arguably one of the most important breeding areas for Carnaby’s Cockatoo, and has been nicknamed ‘Cockatoo Club Med’ thanks to the on ground works that have been carried out.

“The area has been studied for more than 50 years and the information gained is used to compare other sites and shape on ground work for the species into the future,” Rick said. 

“The introduction of a further 10 artificial hollows and the repairs to 10 natural hollows and the replenishment of the 69 existing artificial hollows will ensure that the area has more than 160 hollows in peak condition.”

NACC NRM’s Senior Biodiversity Officer Jarna Kendle says the hard work is all worth it when we see the result of population increases.

“These on ground works are highly beneficial to the overall Carnaby population and we are extremely excited for this year’s monitoring when we get to see these beautiful endangered birds using these hollows to raise their family,” Jarna said, who hopes to see record numbers this year.

Early autumn rains work as a trigger for the Carnaby’s to breed, and with the recent rains reaching up to 100mm, the species could breed potentially nine weeks earlier. Rick Dawson says the numbers have significantly increased over the years, with 2009 producing 41 breeding attempts and 2020 recording a whopping 132.

“If you build it, they will come.”

To find out more about NACC NRM’s Protecting WA’s Black-cockatoos program or any of the incentives available please call NACC NRM’s Senior Biodiversity Program Officer Jarna Kendle on 0448 984 899 or email [email protected]

Jarna Kendle – Senior Biodiversity Officer

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